Hack Education Weekly News: Malala Yousafzai Wins the Nobel Peace Prize

Hack Education Weekly News: Malala Yousafzai Wins the Nobel Peace Prize

This week sucked. It wasn't a great week to be a woman in tech or a woman in ed-tech. So I was pleased this morning when I woke up to the news that Malala Yousafzai has won the Nobel Peace Prize. Lots of other news this week: students strike in Philadelphia in support of their teachers; startups get money; Bill Fitzgerald scrutinizes their Terms of Service; tech companies pledge to not do bad things with students' data but I'm like "suuuuuuuuure." [...]

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Hack Education Weekly News: Iris Scans, Ebola Panic, and Student Protests

Hack Education Weekly News: Iris Scans, Ebola Panic, and Student Protests

Student protests at UC Berkeley, in Hong Kong, at BYU, at Colgate University, and in the Jefferson County Public Schools. Ebola scares in the Dallas area schools. Iris scans in the cafeterias at George Mason University. Educause seemed as awful as ever with the usual suspects spouting the usual claims about disruption and digital revolution. Uber wants to recruit teachers to drive UberXs. $40 million more for Remind, a free messaging startup. I don't understand this world at all. At. All. [...]

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Ed-Tech Imperialism and the XPRIZE for Global Learning

Ed-Tech Imperialism and the XPRIZE for Global Learning

Some first inklings of ideas I want to develop further: ed-tech as imperialism. This week's news about the XPRIZE helped reinforce things I'd already been weighing, namely via a conversation held in the 1980s between Paulo Freire and Seymour Papert. No two men have more influenced my work as an educator more than these two. And I'm struck by how they fail to communicate. It makes me think -- worriedly, I confess -- that perhaps there is no reconciliation between ed-tech and liberation. Because if I had to choose one over the other, it would be freedom and not computers. [...]

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Hack Education Weekly News: The MOOC Backlash Backlash

Hack Education Weekly News: The MOOC Backlash Backlash

MOOCs fought back on all the "end of MOOC" talk this week by raising venture capital and touting their general bigness and awesomeness. In other news, girls win the Google Science Fair's big prize. Blackboard buys a video conferencing company because apparently what they had already sucked. Who'd have guessed. LMS data makes ed-tech pundits write things. Learning object repositories, surprisingly, generate little response. Surveys. Maps. Graphs. And more. [...]

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Teacher Wars and Teaching Machines

Teacher Wars and Teaching Machines

A book review of Dana Goldstein's new book Teacher Wars: A History of America's Most Embattled Profession. I'm really interested in how Goldstein's history can be layered with what I'm working on with Teaching Machines. If, as Goldstein argues, teachers have always been under attack, how can we read the push to develop education technologies? It seems to raise the stakes politically. [...]

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Hack Education Weekly News: LAUSD, iPads, and Grenade Launchers

Hack Education Weekly News: LAUSD, iPads, and Grenade Launchers

In this week's education-related news: AIR releases a report on LAUSD's iPad project. And LOL. It's pretty bad. Only one teacher reported using the Pearson curriculum, which is costing the district $200 per iPad. Pro tip for districts wanting to do one-to-one initiatives. Do everything that LAUSD has done -- except the exact opposite. In other news: MOOCs were a big deal this week. Not sure why. Microsoft confirmed its acquisition of Mojang, maker of Minecraft. And Mojang founder "Notch" promptly quit. But he's a billionaire now, so hey. What do we think the odds are of Microsoft completing screwing up the education versions of Minecraft? Wait. Don't answer that. [...]

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