The History of

The History of "Personalization" and Teaching Machines

Over the last few weeks, there's been a flurry of blog posts debating "personalized learning." Is it a scientific theory? Is it ideology? I weigh in (I hope it's okay that I interrupt the dude-fest discussing the topic!) with some of the research from my book. See, we've been talking about "personalization" via teaching machines for almost a century now. These machines certainly predate the learning theories invoked in the blog posts. I believe that (in part) this is about scientific management, not about the science of learning. [...]

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Hack Education Weekly News: Yes, There is a Student Loan Crisis

Hack Education Weekly News: Yes, There is a Student Loan Crisis

In this week's news: The Department of Education revises its oversight of special education programs (more testing!). The Department of Education has a social media faux pas as it tries to promote FAFSA completion. Tennessee quits PARCC. Arizona remains awful for education and for people of color. Legal decisions in the News Corp phone hacking case. The Supreme Court has ruled that the police need a warrant to search your cellphones. Do schools? [...]

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The History of Ed-Tech via Patent Applications

The History of Ed-Tech via Patent Applications

Weekend ramblings -- with bonus image content! -- on patents. What can we learn about the history of ed-tech through patents? What do patents tell us about technological development? And with all the problems with intellectual property and the patent system, what do patents tell us about business? About power? About intellectual history? About the narratives surrounding education and technology and "solutionism"? [...]

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Hack Education Weekly News: The Starbucks

Hack Education Weekly News: The Starbucks "Free College Tuition" PR Campaign

In this week's education news: Starbucks and ASU Online (which is handled by Pearson) try to convince the good folks of America that they're handing out free college tuition, and thanks to the extremely well-oiled churnalism machine, we almost fell for it. 'Til someone read the fine print. Those meddling kids! (RIP Casey Kasem.) Udacity and AT&T want to convince us that "nanodegrees" are a good idea. Mmmhmmm. OK. Obama wants to have a Race to the Top as part of his reorganization of the Bureau of Indian Education. [...]

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Un-Fathom-able: The Hidden History of Ed-Tech #CETIS14

Un-Fathom-able: The Hidden History of Ed-Tech #CETIS14

Here are the notes and my slides from the keynote I delivered today at CETIS 2014 (which was an amazingly awesome event and a good reminder for me about why I can be optimistic about the future of technology -- because I believe in people like those present.) I used my keynote to talk about the "hidden history" of ed-tech, something I feel that it's important to talk about in the face of the tech industry's "myopic fixation on the future." But it's also important to talk about history at this particular moment in UK ed-tech (politics, history, policy, etc) too. [...]

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Hack Education Weekly News: Teacher Tenure and the Turing Test

Hack Education Weekly News: Teacher Tenure and the Turing Test

A big week for education news. In California, a ruling was handed down in Vergara v California that overturns 5 laws in the state relating to teacher tenure and teacher seniority. A win for the Silicon Valley magnate who funded the student-plaintiffs. And 4 universities "band together" to share digital services. Their first step to resist outsourcing: outsource the initiative to a third party vendor. I love the way you guys think! That'll show 'em. Also journalists fail the Turing Test, all parroting reports that a chat-bot had passed the Turing Test. [...]

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